Skylands Urology Group
Skylands Urology Group
Skylands Urology Group
Skylands Urology Group
Skylands Urology Group
Skylands Urology Group

Can a Vasectomy be reversed?

Occasionally, a patient’s decision about reproduction may change. If this were to happen, the patient may be a candidate for reversal. The success rate is best for patients choosing reversal with shorter interval time from vasectomy.

Can vasectomy lead to heart disease, prostate or testicular cancer?

Several studies in humans found either minimal or no increased risk in developing these issues after vasectomy.

What are the complications of vasectomy?

Bleeding or hematoma formation in the scrotum is the biggest risk. Patients are encouraged to wear scrotal support and bed rest after the procedure for 48 hours to prevent any bleeding. To prevent the rare case of infection, patients are given a few days of antibiotics. For discomfort, patients will get a prescription for pain medications. Long-term risks include post vasectomy pain…
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What is a No-scalpel vasectomy?

In the no-scalpel technique, a clamp is inserted into the scrotum and the skin is stretched to gain access to the vasa. This technique has reported lower rates of bleeding.

How is the Vasectomy procedure performed?

Vasectomy is typically performed at an outpatient surgical center. The traditional vasectomy approach involves a single 1-2cm incision in the scrotum to visualize and mobilize the vas deferens. A portion of the vas is excised and the ends are occluded with electro cautery and clips.

Do patients need counseling prior to vasectomy?

Yes. Your physician will review the risks and benefits of vasectomy including long-term effects associated with vasectomy. The surgery will be described in detail, as well as the alternatives. The patient’s family status will be discussed including number of children and future intent as the procedure may be permanent. All questions will be answered.

What is a Vasectomy?

Vasectomy is currently the most cost effective option for male contraception. The reported success rates exceed 98 percent. The alternative procedure for women is tubal ligation, but this is performed under general anesthesia, requiring a laparoscopic surgery with its associated risks. Vasectomy is done in the outpatient setting and involves occlusion or disruption of the vas deferens, the passage for sperm to…
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